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SUPREME COURT
ASSISTANCE PROJECT

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Resources for Legal Research on FOIA

 

Public Citizen's Foia litigation and advocacy

Since its founding in 1972, Public Citizen Litigation Group has litigated more Freedom of Information Act cases than any other organization.  We have secured from government files information about health risks, safety concerns, financial problems, and numerous other issues of importance.  To learn more about PCLG's long history of open government work, read our short history, "Obtaining Access to Government Records Since 1972." 

Other Resources on FOIA

  1. Statutes
  2. Regulations
  3. Litigation
  4. FOIA History and Statistics
  5. FOIA Treatises
  6. Bulletins on FOIA
  7. Government Guidance Documents on Transparency
  8. Classification and National Security
  9. Other Organizations' Resources

1. Statutes   [top]

Freedom of Information Act

    PCLG on the 2007 Amendments: Summary and Legislative History

    PCLG on the 1996 Amendments: Summary and Legislative History

Paperwork Reduction Act, Cornell University Legal Information Institute

Privacy Act, Cornell University Legal Information Institute

Records Disposal Act, Cornell University Legal Information Institute

Presidential Records Act, Cornell University Legal Information Institute

Government in the Sunshine Act, Cornell University Legal Information Institute

 

2. Regulations   [top]

PCLG's Agency Database contains links to each agency's handbook on requesting information, FOIA regulations, FOIA contact information, and FOIA annual reports.

3.  Litigation   [top]

PCLG archive of significant judicial decisions interpreting the FOIA through 2002

Litigation documents from PCLG's open government cases

4. FOIA History and Statistics   [top]

40 Years of FOIA, 20 Years of Delay, National Security Archive

Lessons Learned from Thirty Years of Experience with the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, speech by PCLG's Amanda Frost, 2000

The United States Freedom of Information Act, speech by PCLG's Lucinda Sikes, 1997

Archive of Statistics on Agency Backlogs, compiled by PCLG, 2000-2005

5. FOIA Treatises   [top]

ABA Restatement of FOIA: American Bar Association Committee document produced as part of a project to generate comprehensive and authoritative description of the current state of administrative law.

6. Bulletins on FOIA   [top]

FOIA Post from the Office of Information and Privacy: Department of Justice's Office of Information and Privacy hosts FOIA Post, a new means of disseminating Freedom of Information Act-related information to federal agencies government wide.

Access Reports: Access Reports publishes a newsletter on federal, state and international freedom of information and privacy issues.

7. Government Guidance Documents on Transparency   [top]

Executive Orders and Other White House Guidance

Department of Justice Guidance

Office of Management and Budget Guidance


Other Agency Guidance

8. Classification and National Security   [top]

Executive Orders

Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO)

  • ISOO Reports (this office oversees the security classification programs in both government and industry).

   ISOO 2008 Report to the President
   ISOO 2007 Report to the President
   ISOO 2006 Report to the President
   ISOO 2005 Report to the President
   ISOO 2004 Report to the President
   ISOO 2003 Report to the President
   ISOO 2002 Report to the President
   ISOO 2001 Report to the President
   ISOO 2000 Report to the President

  • ISOO Directive No. 1 (Oct. 13, 1995), This Directive implements Executive 12958 by setting forth guidance to agencies on original and derivative classification, downgrading and declassification.
  • ISOO Directive on Safeguarding Classified National Security Information (Sept. 24, 1999), This Directive implements provisions of Executive Order 12958, Classified National Security Information, that pertain to the handling, storage, distribution, transmittal, destruction of, and accounting for classified information.
  • Highlights of the Activities of the Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP), January - December 2002.  ISCAP was established by executive order 12958 to rule on appeals from government employees who challenged agency classification policies; to approve, deny, or amend agency exemptions from automatic declassification requirements; and to rule on appeals from members of the public who have filed requests for mandatory declassification.

 

Freedominfo.org: provides country-by-country information on international FOI laws

National Security Archive: research institute that provides information on FOIA domestically and internationally

OMB Watch: provides analysis and updates on current information policy issues

Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press: provides free legal assistance to journalists

 

9. Other Organizations' Resources [top]

Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy: extensive archive of materials on government classification and secrecy policies

Freedominfo.org: provides country-by-country information on international FOI laws

National Security Archive: research institute that provides information on FOIA domestically and internationally

OMB Watch: provides analysis and updates on current information policy issues

Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press: provides free legal assistance to journalists

 


 

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